Cyber Cafes Are Signing out from the Indian Market, Taking Back It’s Old School Romance

Let’s give a moment to recall a simple task that we all used to do back in the days: going to the cyber cafes. We don’t remember it anymore, because the internet access is not extinct, rather it came more handy and available everywhere. What technologically advanced means now didn’t use to mean the same twenty years back.  A room full of computers, mostly operated by students, job holders and job seekers –is much like exotic place. It used to feel like we are in the ‘future’ (which we stepped right now at the present); it felt like the Wi-Fi enabled smart city of modern India encapsulated within a small room.

  Comment(s) : 0

Sitting on a small size bench or a chair, getting engaged in school projects, internet browsing, printing, taking notes and additional data from the giant web browsers; this used to feel like working under a giant IT hub, as if we are some kind of a computer geek.

And now, with the coming of internet accessibility and smartphones with cheaper internet rates, people have almost shift their gears into operating everything related to the internet right at their fingertips. The cyber cafe markets are signing out from the Indian market, especially from the urban metropolitan cities. On small towns and villages however there are some cyber cafes.

Types of people who used to visit Cyber Cafes:

The queue used to be long. Some particular types of personalities largely conquered the cyber cafes:

There were school students coming at a bunch, all united in same uniform, busy taking notes from the internet. Either they used to pen down everything on their copies or take a printout of the notes. 

Students coming directly after their tuition classes got over, in bunches, all taking notes from the internet, downloading it, either taking it on their pendrive or a printout is more convenient.

Job holders get engaged in their pending official assignments, all in a hurry because they have to report it back to the office on an urgent basis.

On the other hand, there were the job seekers who used to spend hours going through previous years’ government exam papers, taking down notes on General Knowledge and Current Affairs, downloading it on PDF version and filling up some online forms.


Leaving all the worries behind, there were some young romantic people, who just used to explore the internet, engage themselves in Yahoo, Hotmail and Orkut.

• Parents and elderly people used to come with minimal idea of how to use the internet and they end up hiring the cyber cafe’s assistant almost permanently, basically asking him to fill up some forms or printing out some important documents.

• And lastly there were young couples who have nothing to do with the internet and computers, rather they engage themselves exploring a bit of romance in the corner of the back row, where nobody would even come to watch them.

And now we don’t even see them anymore. There are many valid reasons behind the disappearance of cyber cafes. 

Firstly, the availability of broadband and cheaper internet access led people to have them at home as well. 

• Secondly, PCs and laptops became available to people at cheaper price. 

With cell-phones and smartphones becoming handy at affordable prices, the telecom companies started providing internet at pocket-friendly rates. 

And due to all these reasons, the internet browsing became accessible neat-at-hand.

In 2013 5% of people visited cyber cafes against 46% in 2009. Whereas at home, the percentage rose from 58% to 78%, according to a study of Tata Consultancy Services.

The Cyber cafes have lost its old charm and are failing to attract people in this era of free Wi-Fi. People are grabbing internet from the free Wi-Fi zones if they run out of pocket internet. Dongles and Hotspots are taking over the cyber cafe’s slow internet speed.

Hotmail romance is replaced by WhatsApp conversations. Orkut is replaced by Online Facebook Messenger. Still somewhere the memories linger as we have step a long way forward towards what we thought as the ‘future’


Comment(s):

There are no comments yet

Leave a comment:




More Stories